The Manticore’s Secret- Book Review

 

The Manticore's Secret- Samit Basu
The Manticore's Secret- Samit Basu

This one is my favorite book in the Gameworld Trilogy. And I absolutely love it. If I could, I’d wrap up my review here-This book is brilliant, go read it. But no, professional obligations require me to wax eloquent for longer, and I must admit, I like the prospects.

The Manticore’s Secret begins with the hush-hush arrival of Ravians back into the world and our hero Kirin trying to do good as the new Dark Lord. There’s chaos and confusion in the world, each race trying to seize control and set their grand plans of world domination into action. Basu plays upon the various conflicts while keeping the reading thoroughly entertained with his eccentric and smart heroes and heroines. If earlier there was the love triangle of Maya, Asvin and Kirin, now it has expanded into a love parallelogram. And if you count the villains in each sub-love-story, oh boy, it is delicious drama.

Basu introduces more plotlines and subtexts into the second installment, the best of them being Maya meeting the unwaba, who tells her about the gods playing with this world. You know all those times when you’ve had the feeling that the gods above are playing with your lives and treating it as a sitcom that they can manipulate according to their various whims? Well, Basu proves that to be the case in his tale, with the many powerful deities creating this Gameworld and each one trying to win it, by hook or crook. That has to be one of the most entertaining and pun-ny concepts I’ve come across in a long long time.

If you were delighted by his characters last time, this time you’d be overjoyed when you meet some more creatures of Basu’s mind. One of the most interesting one is Red, the shapeshifter. The many small battles fought between her various alter-egos will trouble and amuse you throughout the book. Better even are the names Basu gives her and her alter-egos. They help you imagine her in all her fictional glory. I think that’s one of the strong points for his characterizations- they are enormously helpful for people who have this compulsive visual imagination. And while most series, begin to start doing the “for the greater good” rigmarole, SB strays from the normal path and lets his characters make decisions that will work out for their good, with the greater good being an accidental positive outcome. And that is what makes them so much more relatable and more importantly, likeable.

All in all, a fabulous read. Go pick it up now. And after you’re done send it over to me. I’d like to re-read it.

 

You can also read the review here.

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